My 15 Hours In Masaya National Park

I am just going to get it out-of-the-way; sometimes, I break the law. It is generally trespassing, but I can not say I have not broken other laws, especially the drinking law in the US, because after traveling and being allowed to drink, there is no going back! Now, if you want a blogger who follows all of the laws, is an upstanding world citizen, and travels in general luxury on around fifty dollars a day, then look somewhere else, because that is not The Travel Economist, but if you want a crazy blogger who travels on about ten dollars a day while having incredible and unique adventures, adventures that very few others will ever experience, adventures that you can not pay for (thankfully!) then you have found the right guy!

I had been up for two hours already (5.45AM)
I had been up for two hours already (5.45AM)

Around in the town of Masaya at around five-thirty at night and made my way over to the Masaya Naional Park entrance. I already knew that they were closed and that they have night tours, so I knew I was not going to legally get in that night, and if I did get in, I would have to watch out for the tour. The guard was still at the gate, so I asked him what time they open and closed and for a map of the park to study for the next day; not a complete lie! Then to pass the time, I walked over to the town of Nindiri to get some dinner and food for breakfast; I made it back over to the gate at 7.30. I found not one, but two guards at the gate and figured it would be nearly impossible to sneak past them, so I decided to go over and tell them the truth. I told them that I have no good place to camp for the night and if, even though the park is already closed, I could camp out there. I got the permission, and with that, I was legally in the park! But only to sleep in the restroom area right inside the gates. I figured, “no problem, they will not have guards here twenty-four hours a day!” – I was wrong! I never expected a national park to pay for guards all night long. After going to sleep in my sleeping bag at eight and waking up at three forty-five in the morning, I packed up my stuff and got ready to head into the park to reach the peak by sunrise, but right as I was leaving, the guard was coming! My heart raced and I quickly came up with a plan, I decided to set my stuff down and sit down next to it. If he asked, I would tell him I simply could not sleep, and packed up my stuff out of boredom so it would be ready for morning. Luckily, he just said, “Tranquillo?” (relaxing?) I told him, “Si” and he went on his way, an hour later, I was on my way!

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“Do Not Enter” has no meaning to me!

I walked for about an hour and a half before making it to the main crater. I walked to the left and saw a sign that read something like, “300MTS to caves, available with night tour by guide,” and headed down the road to it. There are some trails throughout the park, but most of it is a paved road. I walked down to the unmarked, but obvious, trail that led to the cave, and once I found it, followed the carved stairs into the cave created by the volcano. The photo above is not of the main cave, the main cave has a pretty big entrance and no signs, also, the trail ends at it, so it is not to be missed. After walking a minute into the cave, the only light was that of my headlamp, after a couple of minutes, I reached the main attraction – an area filled with a couple of hundred bats! This was my first experience in a bat cave, I have always wanted to get into one, but never had the chance, so this was amazing to me. I stayed in the cave, mesmerized by the bats, a bit nervous and very excited, for about a half hour before leaving due to a dying head lamp and the worry that someone would find my backpack that I left near the entrance to the trail as a precaution – if anything happened to me (having no helmet on,) then they could quickly find me knowing that someone must have taken the trail to the cave.

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In the bat cave formed by lava

When I headed back to retrieve my gear, I saw a man standing with it with a curious look on his face, and I thought to myself, “Oh no, I am in trouble.” When I reached him, he was not upset, he simply said to me that leaving my stuff there was dangerous – it was still only seven-thirty in the morning, the park was not supposed to open for another hour and a half and I did not expect anyone to show up for at least another half-hour, but he was a local, working with the cattle and horses that roamed the park and did not work directly for the park. I thanked him for looking out for my stuff and we went on our own ways; I, obviously, relieved and thanking God that he did not report me!

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I continued back up to the volcano area again, explored a bit more of the park, and at eight-thirty, started walking towards the entrance of the park. At just past nine O’clock, a van of workers passed me with the most curious looks as to why this tourist is coming down from the volcano only a few minutes after it opened, but, they did not stop. Others passed me in the same manner. When I finally reached the guard gate at just passed ten, I stepped over the chain that prevented cars from entering or exiting without paying, said, “adios” to the somewhat confused guard, and was on my way to my next destination having had free entrance into the park, and safe place to sleep, and a day of the park all to myself!

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I am not sure if this tactic is duplicable,┬áit was difficult and relied on the main security boss’s decision to let me in and the guard at the gate being less than alert. As you can see below, there is a road that goes from thee Nindiri area following the Masaya Lagoon and into the parks camping area. I considered taking this route, but decided the distance was too far to go by myself at night and it was possible that I would not be able to get in that way anyway. The man who found my stuff along with a few others came in from the cave area, which leads me to believe that the route is able to be used to enter the park after closing and without having to worry about the guards, or by taking one of the roads from behind, such as the Panama road.

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There are two other options to having access to the park for the night; the first is to enter the park before three in the afternoon, you will then be allowed to enter because you have enough time to go to the top and back before five; while you are in the park, find one of thousands of different hiding spots to hide out at until around eight or later, the later, the better. At this time, all of the night tours and guards will be out of the park and at the main gate area or at the camping area. You then have access to the park to yourself.

The second option is to do as the first option, but, instead of hiding, register for the allocated camping area, and then, around two or three in the morning, sneak past the guard and into the park.

It is also important to note that during their rainy season, May-mid-November, often, the weather creates too much smoke in the volcano’s crater to be able to see the main attraction of the night tours – the glow of lava in the crater! I met a group who had just finished the night tour, and they could not see anything.

To enjoy the park legally;

Park opens: 9AM

Closes: 5PM

Night Tours: 5PM and 7:30PM $10

Entrance fee – non-residence – $4

So, have you had any close calls while trespassing or any similar situations to mine? Leave a comment and let me know, I would love to read about your stories!

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